Wandering Camera

Album 232
(Translated by
Larissa Rogacheva.)

 

Then eventually Baroque made way for Classicism; the Englishman Charles Cameron replaced the Italian Bartholomew Rasstrelly as a new executive architect of the Great Palace.

 

I just had an idea: the enfilades are very well suited for ceremonial processions, arent they?
The Green Dining Room

The Architect - C.Cameron, Sculptor I. Martos

Somehow it makes me think of the funeral hall

The reliefs on the wall depict Greek mythology.

The Waiters Room

The Architect -C.Cameron and V. Stasov

The Blue Drawing Room

The Architect - C.Cameron, 1752-56

Restored in 1959

The walls decorated with French silk

It is one of very few rooms, were the original parquetry did survive the war.

The mirror and the clock on the fireplace mantelpiece in the Blue Drawing Room.
The Bedroom

The Architect - C.Cameron

The columns are quite a marvel of ingenuity; they are made of china with metal reinforcing rods inside.

The medallions on the top are by sculptor I. Murtos.

The Chandelier
The Alexander Is Study Room

The Architect - V. Stasov (in collaboration with the artist F.Brandukoff)

Yet another Chandelier
The next: a few separate objects, all of them from the same room, I just dont remember which one
The candelabra
The Clock
The Big Vase with a picture of an unknown town.
The Serving Platter

Coincidentally, the castle pictured on the platter can also be seen in one of albums.

The name of this castle is Rosenburgh. It is in the vicinity of Copenhagen. Dated at the beginning of the 17th Century, it is situated in the middle of the Kings Parklands. 

Most probably this platter came to Russia with Nicholas The IIs mother, who was a Danish princess.

Very Interesting Chair

Notice the shape of chairs arm supports.

The name of chair: The shaft-bow, axe and mittens. On the shaft-bow you can read the motto Slow and steady wins the race.

The project was designed in the workshop of Schtiglits & Schutov around 1870-71.


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